Website Started Sept. 2001
RIGHT click here.
Click on CREATE
SHORTCUT
Click on YES
An icon will be on
your Desktop so
you can easily
check in once in a
while.
Site Stats
June 13th to June 19th
81 total visitors  +0%
35 new visitors  -10%
166 pages viewed  -16%
Avg. Visit 1 min. & 32
Seconds  -7%
Most page views from IE
browser


The Stats are provided by
Yahoo , we use their
Sitebuilder for our website.

Avg. 954  Hits  /  month
Last Entry May 30
The Reunion is on   September 17, for
Amity Hall Uptown
on 108-109 Street Amsterdam Ave.

The price will be similar, and it will be
daytime say, 1:00 to 4:00
with open bar and food.
Peg   
eddypeg@yahoo.com

Perhaps you should post on the facebook
pages and the webpage to get a response
Sayings

In the old west a .45 cartridge for a six-gun cost 12 cents, so did a glass of
whiskey. If a cowhand was low on cash he would often give the bartender a
cartridge in exchange for a drink.
This became known as a "shot" of whiskey.


THE WHOLE NINE YARDS
American fighter planes in WW2 had machine guns that were fed by a belt of
cartridges. The average plane held belts that were 27 feet (9 yards) long. If
the pilot used up all his ammo
he was said to have given it the “whole nine yards.“


BUYING THE FARM
This is synonymous with dying. During WW1 soldiers were given life insurance
policies worth $5,000. This was about the price of an average farm so if you
died you
"bought the farm" for your survivors.


IRON CLAD CONTRACT
This came about from the ironclad ships of the Civil War.
It meant something so strong it could not be broken.


PASSING THE BUCK / THE BUCK STOPS HERE
Most men in the early west carried a jack knife made by the Buck knife
company. When playing poker it was common to place one of these Buck knives
in front of the dealer so that everyone knew who he was. When it was time for
a new dealer the deck of cards
and the knife were given to the new dealer.
If this person didn't want to deal he would "pass the buck"
to the next player.
If that player accepted then "the buck stopped there".


RIFF RAFF
The Mississippi River was the main way of traveling from north to south.
Riverboats carried passengers and freight but they were expensive so most
people used rafts. Everything had the right of way over rafts which were
considered cheap. The steering
oar on the rafts was called a "riff" and this transposed into
“riff-“raff, meaning low class.